Lewis & Clark: The National Bicentennial Exhibition Exhibition Locations

For Educators: Teaching Units & Lesson Plans:

Women

INTRODUCTION TO UNIT

Target Grade Level:
Middle and High School, Grades 6 - 12

Indian women influenced the expedition despite the fact that Lewis and Clark had little direct contact with them. All along the way, Lewis and Clark wrote that Indian women were oppressed; they failed, however, to see the various powers that these women possessed. Their understanding of a woman's role in society was based on a Euro-American model. Sacagawea was the only woman to accompany Lewis and Clark on their journey west. It is the goal of this unit to investigate both Sacagawea's role as the sole woman on the journey and the role of Indian women on the northern plains during this time period.

Explore Connections to Today for this unit.

MAJOR UNDERSTANDINGS

All societies define gender roles.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

How do perceptions about gender roles shape what we see?

KEY KNOWLEDGE OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • understand that interpretations of history vary
  • study historical evidence about Sacagawea's life
  • identify ways that Mandan and Hidatsa women held power in their society
  • recognize differing views in primary and secondary sources
  • investigate four women contemporaries of Lewis and Clark
  • understand that sources provide different types of information

KEY SKILL OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • compare and contrast Indian women with Euro-American women
  • use historical documentation as a basis for narrative writing
  • analyze primary source materials and draw conclusions
  • evaluate information for validity

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT SUGGESTIONS

Students will give evidence of their grasp of knowledge and skills by means of teacher-directed class discussions, writing exercises, use of graphic organizers, poster presentations, quizzes, and skits.


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